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Wayward bear causes accident

Bob Cage, renowned artist, athlete and tobacconist, dies

Robert F. "Bob" Cage, a Halifax native, was known for his achievements in an array of fields that he pursued with customary passion.

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‘Sunday Morning’ in South Boston

SoVaNow.com / April 15, 2013
South Boston resident and Hugo Award-winning artist and author Ron Miller will be appearing on the CBS news program, “Sunday Morning,” to expound on the influence that science fiction has had on modern-day scientific advances.

Sunday Morning correspondant Mo Rocca traveled this week to South Boston to interview Miller, whose space- and science-themed works have appeared in National Geographic, Scientific American and other publications. He has authored or collaborated on more than 50 books, many of them science fiction.

The “Sunday Morning” segment will air this Sunday, April 21. It was taped Friday in the living room of Miller’s South Boston home and will take up about five or six minutes of the morning news magazine.

“I’ve done this kind of thing before,” Miller said, “so it’s nothing new for me, but it is always fun.”

Miller said he will be talking about science fiction writers going back as far back as the 19th century and leading into the 20th century.

Miller is fascinated by how these writers predicted inventions and innovations that since have become reality. “I think they have inspired people by their writing to move forward and make those predictions come true,” he said.

He cites the example of the young Russian who in the 1920s invented the first helicopter. The young man, Igor Sikousky, recounted how he had read the works of Jules Verne and was so excited by his imagined whirlygig that he decided to build a helicopter.

Miller also held up Verne’s book, “Earth to Moon,” as one that has been read by many influential figures in the history of space travel.

Miller is the 2002 winner of the Hugo Award, presented annually to the top works of fantasy and science fiction, for his book The Art of Chesley Bonestell, about the American astronomical painter and illustrator dubbed “The Father of Modern Space Art.”

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